The Christian Noob (n00b)

born & raised Catholic, now going to a Presbyterian church & still learning

the wrath of God, revised

At times, I wonder if I truly believe in God or if I’m holding to a tradition in spite of my thousands of doubts. After all, some of my favorite writers and naysayers are

  1. Isaac Asimov (1920-1992),

    “Creationists make it sound like a ‘theory’ is something you dreamt up after being drunk all night.”

    “Although the time of death is approaching me, I am not afraid of dying and going to Hell or (what would be considerably worse) going to the popularized version of Heaven. I expect death to be nothingness and, for removing me from all possible fears of death, I am thankful to atheism.”

  2. George Carlin (1937-2008),

    “Atheism is a non-prophet organization.”

    “Religion easily has the best bullshit story ever told. Think about it. Religion has convinced people that there’s an invisible man… living in the sky. Who watches everything you do every minute of every day. And the invisible man has a list of ten things he doesn’t want you to do. And if you do any of these things, he will send you to a special place, of burning and fire and smoke and torture and anguish for you to live forever, and suffer, and burn, and scream […] until the end of time. But he loves you. He loves you. He loves you and he needs money. He always need money.”

  3. Richard Dawkins (b. 1941),

    “One of the things that is wrong with religion is that it teaches us to be satisfied with answers which are not really answers at all.”

    “Religion is about turning untested belief into unshakable truth through the power of institutions and the passage of time.”

  4. Albert Einstein (1879-1955),

    “I cannot conceive of a God who rewards and punishes his creatures, or has a will of the type of which we are conscious in ourselves. An individual who should survive his physical death is also beyond my comprehension, nor do I wish it otherwise; such notions are for the fears or absurd egoism of feeble souls.”

    “I came — though the child of entirely irreligious (Jewish) parents — to a deep religiousness, which, however, reached an abrupt end at the age of twelve.”

  5. C.S. Lewis (1898-1963) before converting to Christianity,

    “Theocracy is the worst of all governments. If we must have a tyrant, a robber baron is far better than an inquisitor. The baron’s cruelty may sometimes sleep, his cupidity at some point be sated; and since he dimly knows he is doing wrong he may possibly repent. But the inquisitor who mistakes his own cruelty and lust of power and fear for the voice of Heaven will torment us infinitely because he torments us with the approval of his own conscience and his better impulses appear to him as temptations.”

  6. Karl Marx (1818-1883),

    “Religion is the opiate of the masses.”

    “The first requisite of the happiness of the people is the abolition of religion.”

  7. Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900),

    Nietzsche187a“Christianity as antiquity.– When we hear the ancient bells growling on a Sunday morning we ask ourselves: Is it really possible! This, for a jew, crucified two thousand years ago, who said he was God’s son? The proof of such a claim is lacking. Certainly the Christian religion is an antiquity projected into our times from remote prehistory; and the fact that the claim is believed – whereas one is otherwise so strict in examining pretensions – is perhaps the most ancient piece of this heritage. A god who begets children with a mortal woman; a sage who bids men work no more, have no more courts, but look for the signs of the impending end of the world; a justice that accepts the innocent as a vicarious sacrifice; someone who orders his disciples to drink his blood; prayers for miraculous interventions; sins perpetrated against a god, atoned for by a god; fear of a beyond to which death is the portal; the form of the cross as a symbol in a time that no longer knows the function and ignominy of the cross — how ghoulishly all this touches us, as if from the tomb of a primeval past! Can one believe that such things are still believed?” (Human, all too Human)

    “Christianity was from the beginning, essentially and fundamentally, life’s nausea and disgust with life, merely concealed behind, masked by, dressed up as, faith in ‘another’ or ‘better’ life.” (The Birth of Tragedy, German version)

  8. Gene Roddenberry (1921-1991),

    “We must question the story logic of having an all-knowing all-powerful God, who creates faulty Humans, and then blames them for his own mistakes.”

    “I condemn false prophets, I condemn the effort to take away the power of rational decision, to drain people of their free will–and a hell of a lot of money in the bargain. Religions vary in their degree of idiocy, but I reject them all. For most people, religion is nothing more than a substitute for a malfunctioning brain.”

  9. Bertrand Russell (1872-1970),

    “But for the successful efforts of unbelievers in the past, I could not take so elastic a definition of Christianity as that. As I said before, in olden days it had a much more full-blooded sense. For instance, it included he belief in hell. Belief in eternal hell-fire was an essential item of Christian belief until pretty recent times. In this country, as you know, it ceased to be an essential item because of a decision of the Privy Council, and from that decision the Archbishop of Canterbury and the Archbishop of York dissented; but in this country our religion is settled by Act of Parliament, and therefore the Privy Council was able to override their Graces and hell was no longer necessary to a Christian. Consequently I shall not insist that a Christian must believe in hell.
    To come to this question of the existence of God: it is a large and serious question, and if I were to attempt to deal with it in any adequate manner I should have to keep you here until Kingdom Come, so that you will have to excuse me if I deal with it in a somewhat summary fashion. You know, of course, that the Catholic Church has laid it down as a dogma that the existence of God can be proved by the unaided reason. That is a somewhat curious dogma, but it is one of their dogmas. They had to introduce it because at one time the freethinkers adopted the habit of saying that there were such and such arguments which mere reason might urge against the existence of God, but of course they knew as a matter of faith that God did exist. The arguments and the reasons were set out at great length, and the Catholic Church felt that they must stop it. Therefore they laid it down that the existence of God can be proved by the unaided reason and they had to set up what they considered were arguments to prove it. There are, of course, a number of them, but I shall take only a few.” (Why I Am Not A Christian)

  10. George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950),

    “The fact that a believer is happier than a sceptic is no more to the point than the fact that a drunken man is happier than a sober one. The happiness of credulity is a cheap and dangerous quality.”

who have all doubted and/or refused to believe in God. This almost sounds like The X-Files

“I want to believe.” (2008)

although the latter referred only to aliens. In such case, refer to the Drake equation (“mathematical equation used to estimate the number of detectable extraterrestrial civilizations in the Milky Way galaxy,Wikipedia).

Drake equation

In any case, I continuously feel like a sham although sometimes I feel faithful. Said, if I thought or were worried of the Heaven and hell all the time, I’d definitely consider me going to hell for being so skeptic.

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Frankie Olvera

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Lloyd Kaufman

born & raised Catholic, now going to a Presbyterian church & still learning

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